Knitting help - interpret this line of pattern to English please?

I would like to try making a Feather and Fan scarf, downloaded free from ravelry, but the basic pattern as written is stumping me:

k2, k2tog x 3, [(yo, k1) x 6, k2tog x 6] x3, (yo, k1) x 6, k2tog x 3, k2

I’ve done all the types of stitches, but I am so confused as to how many times I’m supposed to do each section and in which order - the and ( ) are really throwing me off. Could a more seasoned knitter help me out?

Thanks in advance!
Emma

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I’m reading it as

yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog

And you do that entire sequence a total of 3 times in a row. Does that help?

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I don’t knit, but that looks like algebra to me, and I ain’t afraid of no math. Except polynominals.

I think they’re saying repeat the section inside the ( ) or the number of times following the x.
so, “(yo, k1) x 6” means yo, k1 six times.
You would complete the entire operation inside the brackets, then do the entire operation again, for a total of six times, you wouldn’t yo 6 times, then k1 6 times.

incidentally, does that mean yarn over, knit 1?

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For fun, or because I’m a crazy person, here’s how I’d write out the whole thing.

k2

k2tog, k2tog, k2tog

yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog
yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog
yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog, k2tog

yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1

k2tog, k2tog, k2tog

k2

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Yes, this makes sense to me now! I get why they don’t write it out the long way, but also, I feel like I’d need to write it out for myself anyway just to keep track of where I am.

Thank you!

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That’s exactly how I read it! Knitting patterns are indeed just like algebra where you do the maths in the brackets first.

I know many people really hate charts instead of written out instructions, but if you can read a chart maybe you could draw the whole pattern out on a piece of graph paper? I’ve done that sometimes when I really didn’t understand the written instruction.

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Yep, you got it.

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There wasn’t a chart in the pattern I downloaded, but I do find those helpful when they’re present.

Stitch markers, stitch counters, knowing how to “read” your knitting, and never stopping in the middle of a repeat are your friend. The latter being the most important in my experience.

Looking forward to seeing your project!

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Most definitely never stop in the middle of a repeat. I used to do that when I was a novice knitter. Many oddball looking projects happened until I finally learned the lesson.

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I agree with this read.

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Knitting is pretty much math, yeah. My brain enjoys both math and lace knitting :laughing:

yes, this.

oh yeah, i write them out, too. and then move the washi tape down under the row i’m working. row counters rarely work for me, so i type it/print it out, then use washi or a pen for repeats.

@photojenn i did not know you were a knitter!!! MAXIMUM WOOTERIE!

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