Quilted "Roman Shade"

Finished my quilted “Roman Shade”. I used longer strips of velcro at the top, with 3 tabs set evenly along the way on the back and at the bottom, so it could be pulled up in all kinds of different configurations.



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That hook & loop system is so clever! And I bet this will insulate your window very nicely, too. Great job!

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Thank you. Yes, it has raised the inside temperature around the (older) window by 13°f.

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WOW! That’s incredible!

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I thought it was two windows in the first picture!
nice job!

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What a great way to stay warmer! Love that it is versatile as well.

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This is awesome and looks great! I need something like this in my very drafty living room. I hate using the plastic shrink wrap but I really have to- I hate throwing oil money out the window while wearing winter hats and scarves on the couch a bit more!

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I live in Wisconsin and have been trying to get away from plastic to be eco-conscious.

For the past year I’ve been making window quilts for all of my older windows and north facing older wooden door.
Using cotton and or cotton/wool blend batting is key as is using flannel for backing.

The temperature difference for the door is 17°f warmer so it has been worth the effort. Here’s my door setup. I can stll use my window without having to use move the door quilt (the window has it’s own curtain and quilt) and I stuffed batting bits into the roll at the bottom which tends to curve out away from the door when it’s closed.

It was the only way I could figure out getting it to work. Otherwise I’d have had to hang an extra long quilt from a rod installed over the door with a possibility of it eventually being pulled out of the wall from using the door.

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So clever!
I might just have to get over my mental block against learning how to sew. These ideas are great! I, too, have been whittling away plastics in the home and would LOVE to get away from it on the windows. I do like having the see through aspect for day-times, but those also tend to be warmer (it’s South West facing) so maybe I could get away with opening it during the day for light. (I am home full time)

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When I look at the door quilt I see an old fashioned skirt and a veil on top. I’ve been tempted to put some Gone With the Wind ruffles on it. LOL

Just a thought, if you know how to do any sewing at all, you could take a nice looking towel, sew on some ribbon loops, and hang it over your windows. It would help a little bit

Give it a nice bustle! lol

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LOL!

(That’s be a big nope. I’ve made a second era Victorian bustle…once, and don’t wanna do it again. Maybe a bustle pad though, they’re easy - basically a pillow with an attached ribbon to tie around the waist.

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I have the opposite problem; I live in Arizona and summers are HOT! I put foamcore on the exposed windows, just fit it to the window. I can feel the difference near the window.
Next year, I plan to upgrade to rigid foam insulation from the hardware store.

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I never would have thought that windows and door coverings could make that much of a difference, but it’s not super cold where I am. I think the quilted roman shade looks lovely and cozy.

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:eyes: Well, lookie here! :eyes: Your amazing craft is one of this week’s Featured Projects! :rainbow:

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Thank you. :grinning:

I like the idea of a window quilt vs blinds. And the door quilt looks like it has some type of bumper or thicker rolled hem. I bet it can get drafty at the base, too! Your home is all bundled up!

J.

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Yes, I stuffed the bottom hem to make it stand out from the door a little bit as it was closed. It takes the place of a draft stopper.

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That’s a really clever design element.

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Great idea, well executed. That looks very nice with those pretty hanging lanterns in your window nook.

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