SOCKALONG with me - Knit, Crochet, Loom

They’re all gorgeous. The Christmas self-striping yarns are really cute!

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Knitting machines ate so cool. I don’t crank, my wife does and she put together this crank-in. 3 days and lots of socks.



This is an antique Steber we got working. It’s on loan from our local historical society. And a sock was made on it.

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Those machines look so fascinating, I’d never seen them before until you first mentioned them. I had no idea there was actually a community of sock machine users!

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We learned that droves of women in Europe made socks for the troops during WW1. Soldiers were issued a clean pair each day to keep them healthy and able to be on their feet in horrible conditions. The one issue was that the seam of the toe caused some feet to be uncomfortable or even causing blisters.

Lord Kitchener was secretary of war and challenged the women to come up with a better toe, hence the kitchener stitch to finish off socks.

I noticed that some sock makers actually knit the back a bit longer so that the finish is just a row or two above the toes. I haven’t tried that yet, at least not on purpose!

kitchener

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Canadian and American women did, too! I have a reproduction poster from the sock drive - the “our boys need sox - knit your bit” one. Knitters were given yarn and patterns and they had to return a pair of socks, but some were given knitting machines. There was a YouTube channel that did a video on it that was incredibly fascinating, but I can’t remember who it was… EngineeringKnits or ShannonMakes, maybe?

You can find the links to the old knitting pamphlets from The Red Cross and Monarch via Ravelry. Everything from socks and gloves, to sweaters and balaclavas.

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I love learning how women have always used their “crafting” skills to help others. I just wish there was no need for that sort of crafting… :frowning_face:

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That’s something we can all agree on. But, thank goodness for handknit socks. (Men picked up needles for the cause, too!)

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I didn’t know that, so I learned a thing today! My country remained neutral in WWI so my knowledge about that war is seriously lacking. I did some googling about it and came across this, a cheerful picture of some British prisoners of war, happily knitting socks in 1914: https://www.deverhalenvangroningen.nl/uploads/flexblock/c4a3de49-2320-5aef-9c3f-72181c419e5c/3108384675/breien-engelse-kamp-1785_17305.jpg
All foreign military crossing into our territory were captured as prisoners of war, but they weren’t the enemy and weren’t treated badly. And they had lots of time to learn to knit.

In WWII my country was occupied by the nazi’s, and “knitting for victory” was certainly a thing, except it was for a nazi victory - the socks were sent to nazi troops fighting on the Eastern Front. It was seriously frowned upon for anyone to participate in that because the nazi regime was deeply hated by most people, but there are plenty of propaganda pictures of it.

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Yes, I need to include men who also do their part in contributing to charities and other needs in our communities and countries!

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What a fantastic picture!

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A friend of mine likes to joke that anyone who can knit or sew should be top of the list for admittance to the bunkers in any kind of apocalyptic situation. :joy:

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When I was growing up, I was so worried that I wouldn’t be able to sew so I studied how to build a sewing machine. It was silly, of course, since I wouldn’t be able to make the parts. That’s when I decided to learn to knit…after being in a few bunkers in real life, I decided that I would want to go in the initial blast instead…morbid for a kid, but seeing the aftermath of wars and visiting Hiroshima, I still prefer that.

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